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Oct 3, 2018

Where Missing People Go to Hide

Missing persons we recover often speak of the utter loneliness of being alone. Let’s explore where missing people go to hide, when they have a choice.

Where Missing People Go to Hide

Approximately 35,000 people go missing in Australia every year. Those most likely to do so are those with a mental illness, young people, and aged people with dementia in that order. The Salvation Army confirms 1,600 of these disappear for at least a year, some forever more. Some 600 of the 35,000 people are abducted per the Australian Bureau of Statistics. The rest vanish deliberately, or simply drift away. Let’s explore where missing persons go to hide, when they have a choice

Approximately 35,000 people go missing in Australia every year. Those most likely to do so are those with a mental illness, young people, and aged people with dementia in that order. The Salvation Army confirms 1,600 of these disappear for at least a year, some forever more. Some 600 of the 35,000 people are abducted per the Australian Bureau of Statistics. The rest vanish deliberately, or simply drift away. Let’s explore where missing persons go to hide, when they have a choice.

The Most Likely Places Where Missing People Go

Missing persons we recover often speak of the utter loneliness of being alone. Their social support systems evaporate as in a cloud of smoke. Where should they go, and where will they sleep tonight. It makes sense these missing people go somewhere familiar, as they gather their thoughts as to what to do next.

  • Missing people with a mental illness often drift into community space where they feel safe, according to the National Alliance on Mental Illness. They may or may not have been to these places before. Possibilities include public transport hubs, public libraries, places of worship, college and university campuses, community health centres, free meal sites, and shelters including the Salvation Army.

  • Children and teens going missing voluntarily, usually treat going missing as a great adventure. They are still relatively innocent and may not deliberately cover their tracks. Typical places where missing people go in childhood and adolescence include where they congregate with friends, where young people gather, and overnight in a close friend’s home. If they have not been abducted, finding them can be relatively easy.

  • The situation is less straightforward in the case of where missing people go who have dementia. Their immediate consciousness and short-term memory may be non-existent, yet they may still remember a shadow of their past. In many instances, they have an inescapable yearning to return to a familiar place, or an old friend. If you have someone staying with you showing signs of developing dementia, make a note of the places and people they talk about most.

Trust Missing Persons in Australia to Find These Vulnerable People

Young people and persons with a mental illness or dementia are vulnerable. There is an innocent trust about them that people may prey on. Hence it is important to move quickly and effectively when someone in those three categories goes missing. Contact Missing Persons in Australia now for your free phone  consultation. The number to dial is 1300 553 788, or 0401 553 551 after hours.