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Sep 18, 2016

Australia Missing Persons: What Are the True Statistics?

The government takes a while to catch up on data regarding people missing in Australia. In the case of missing persons, this is not particularly serious because the overall trend appears unchanged despite a far-reaching police education program. The Missing Persons in Australia report drafted by Marianne James, Jessica Anderson, and Rudy Putt for the Institute of Criminology in 2008 continues to be a major reference work. 

Their previous report dates from ten years earlier, so perhaps 2018 will be a watershed year for Australia missing persons. We thought it would be interesting to discuss a few key statistics. We note the copyright restriction that we may only use the material for ‘private study, research, criticism or review’ and abide by it.

People Missing In Australia: Some Surprising Facts

Mesdames James, Anderson and Putt applied their minds in chapter two of their report to what they called ‘hidden populations’ and unreported reasons for people missing in Australia. They identify several causes for minority groups being under the radar and their disappearance unreported;

*  Cultural and linguistically diverse (CALD) people with mental health problems being stigmatized and moving on

*  Friends and family of CALD people feeling socially disconnected with society and not
    wanting to associate with authority

*  Homeless people who nobody ever thought to report missing because they had        
    nobody stable to do so

*  
Victims of domestic violence whose abusers want to brush the incident under the carpet
    and evade prosecution

*  Children with sexual issues – LGBT for example – whose parents cannot stomach the
    thought of the ‘stigma’ getting out

These people face a double whammy if their families do not want to find them and they do not want to see them again either. We have no idea how many people in Australia disappeared under these tragic circumstances. We often wonder what happened to them and we wish we could do more.

We Offer Hope for These and Other Australia Missing Persons

The James, Anderson and Putt report went out under the signature of Toni Makkel, Director of the Australian Institute of Criminology. His introductory words ring out as true as ever, ‘to go missing is not a crime’. Missing Persons in Australia offers a confidential service to find missing people in Australia.

We are gender and culture neutral, and we would never attach a stigma to any of the people we discussed - or indeed anybody who is different from the norm. You can call us on 1300 553 788 for a complimentary consultation. If you prefer to send a web mail, we use secure socket technology which encrypts your message.

That is Missing Persons in Australia in a nutshell, utterly discreet and sympathetic. We find Australia missing persons fast, and we encourage them to come home.